Reader Comments

Hey folks, I know it’s been a while since the last entry.  I have a few more topics lined up which I want to cover, but it’s getting harder to dip into the well of memories that are over 30 years old and still find fresh content.  Even if I do eventually run out of things to talk about, this blog will stick around indefinitely because there’s still a steady stream of newcomers discovering it and having fun reminiscing along with the rest of us.

One of my frustrations with this blog format is that while I’ve gotten a lot of great and interesting comments from others who have lived in PHV or the surrounding area, including some German residents who have fond memories of interacting with us Americans, these comments are scattered all over the place so it’s not very conducive to starting up more PHV-related conversation.  For example, a lot of people have chosen to comment on the About page but I bet a lot more of you haven’t looked at that page!  (It’s up there at the top right)

It would be great if there was some sort of centralized message area for a blog.  As the blog owner I do have a special page where I can review the comments to all of the entries, but I don’t think anything like that is available to readers.

One thing you can do, though, is click on the Comments RSS link down in the lower right.  It only shows the more recent comments, but it does give you some indication of what people have been talking about.  You can also subscribe on that page so that you’ll be notified when new comments are entered.  It doesn’t happen all that often, although today was a very busy one with three different comments left by newcomers to the blog.

Anyway, as my bank of PHV and Heidelberg memories is slowly running dry, there are a lot more great memories left by readers in the comments section of various entries to supplement what I’ve written.  Give those a look if you haven’t, and feel free to contribute your own!

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Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , | 11 Comments

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11 thoughts on “Reader Comments

  1. Tom Shelton

    I lived in PHV when I was about 5 thru 7, roughly 1978-81. Mrs. Terrio was my Kindergarten teacher. Most of your stories are just as I remember. From playing in the creepy attics and basements, to the playground with that orange structure with round platform at the top. I can still smell the odor of the stink bombs that kids threw at it too. I played marbles in the dirt as well. T-Ball and soccer. Sounds like we may have been friends, or may have at least been about the same age and there at about the same time…

  2. George

    We lived in the stairwells in Stuttgart a couple years before PHV,and every kid played marbles there and when I got there.To all you you brats out there,why was marbles so cool?

  3. Angie Rimer Covington

    I lived in PHV on Bull Run Court (bldg #8, first stairwell) from 1978 – 1981. I loved reading your posts and looking up my old building. I went to grades 4-7 there and my little sister was in grades 2-5, we left around Thanksgiving of my 7th grade. I used to sneak out of the elementary school and walk to the bowling alley for lunch (by myself!) and would always be back in time. I used to love playing hide and seek in the basements and laundry rooms. The BAQ’s (the Building Attic Quarters) were actually used for temporary housing and could be used for visitors with permission. We used to call them “the temps.” One of my favorite memories of PHV was how Halloween was such a big deal. Each stairwell would decorate and hand out candy. It was like a huge giant party back then. My sister and I used to ride our 10-speeds to the Heidelberg swimming pool in the Summers. It might sound crazy now, but we would ride by ourselves, spend the day, and come back home. Thank you for making me smile today. Such sweet memories.

  4. Signe Maehler

    Hi phvarmybrat
    I am absolutely overwhelmed by your blog. I am a German living in Heidelberg and I am working on an exhibition about the relationship between the Americans and the people of Heidelberg. As everybody has left PHV and MTV now I think it’s about time to get this exhibition together. It will take a while to put it together but I think with the help of people like you and your readers it could be a great experience.
    So far I know that I want to put the emphasis on the RELATIONSHIP between Americans and Germans from 1945 up to 2014. I am sure there are lots of photographs and letters, maybe diaries or other personal memories.
    It would be great if I could get connected to some people through this blog and I would be very grateful for any help.

  5. cleo

    some of my favorite PHV memories…….going door to door trading comic books!!!!! Saturdays Matinee’s $.25 for the movie, $.10 for the popcorn…..going to the bookstore, to wait for the new comics. Going to the bowling alley during lunchtime, spending my money on green apple gum! Things i hated, having to walk home for lunch and then back to school. Having to go get the clothes off the clothes line. Was there late 60, early 70’s

  6. vanessa

    so many of these memories are crystal clear to me… I am not finding anything about you…is it possible we were friends, because seriously some of these things are spooky. I was in Heidelberg from 1980-1984, then moved to KTown until 1990. My name is Vanessa, and my younger sister was Ronnica…

  7. Dawn Langnas

    My dad was stationed at the Army hospital in Heidelberg. My family and I came to Germany to be with him in 1960-62. We lived in PHV in 1960-62. The buildings were condemned for a building structure problem so my mother decided to take us back to the states in 62.
    My four siblings and I have so many good memories of PHV. Days of riding our “english racer” bikes all over the village. The German carnivals that would come and set up where the houses were. Days of playing at the big playground, playing kickball in the grassy areas between the buildings. The storage rooms in the basements that connected the entire long building were incredible for roller skating, and also an occasional empty storage room to play in. Saturday movies were the best. In those early years all you needed was your dog tags to get into the matinee. I loved the comic book store and still love the smell of books because of that store. Reading and trading comics was fun. Anyone remember the beer trucks? There were beer boxes (like milk boxes) in the hallways outside your door, if you were so inclined. If you needed a refill you just flipped your beer sign up in the living room window. I believe the beer was Schlitz. Also the German craftsman would come into the village with their huge draft horses, pulling a huge wagon loaded with whatever craft they were selling. It was a sight to behold for a little girl. I have so many good memories of PHV days.

  8. I am in Heidelberg on business and took a look at Campbell Barracks, Heidelberg High School and Mark Twain Village, where I lived as an Army brat in the 70’s. While not PHV, it’s all very connected. We used to take the bus to the teen club at PHV on Saturday nights. I also swam on the Sea Lions and rode the bus to practice where we picked up kids in both PHV and MTV. It does bring back memories and it’s sad to see much of MTV being demolished.

  9. I am in Heidelberg now for business and went by MTV and took a few photos of the apartments and the Heidelberg High School. While not PHV, they are all very connected. I lived there in the mid 70’s and rode the bus to PHV to go to the teen club and pick up teammates for swim team. It’s too bad to see much of MTV being demolished. The high school is being renovated, though.

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